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Music with a mission

I am sat at my computer 3 weeks after returning home from a 9,000km round trip that has changed me forever.  I had no idea where I was headed emotionally and physically and I actually went with no expectations, but one thing I knew for sure and that is my life would never be the same again.

There has been much controversy over the offshore processing of refugees on Manus and Nauru. I wanted to find a way to seek the truth and I was feeling helpless and overwhelmed as I watched the cruel regime of our government and it’s treatment of refugees. So I planned to go to Manus to play music and document the trip…Why? because I wanted to use music to connect with the friends that I had made there and then show the world that the men on Manus are just regular human beings like us. Like mine and your sons, our brothers or cousins. Thank you to local film maker Tim Maisey for trusting in me and taking the journey with me and for doing a fantastic job of documenting the experience.

How did I get involved in this journey?

Around 2 years ago I noticed that my very good friend and textile artist Ruth Halbert was becoming more involved in the very politicised issue of offshore processing on Manus Island and Nauru.  I wasn’t really aware of what it was all about and after all I was way too busy with my music career and my family to fit anything else into my life.  But then she started writing letters to the Prime Minster Malcom Turnball every day….I mean every day.  She was writing for every woman, man and child in offshore detention.  I was slowly starting to notice more and more facebook posts that were damning of the Australian Government and the name Peter Dutton kept coming up.  I don’t have a TV so I had not idea who he was but I could see he was creating a few problems. Then in June 2017 Ruth was asked to contribute her work to the Denmark Festival of Voice, so she asked members of the community if they would read aloud the letters for 30 mins at a time.  So i put my hand up to be one of the readers and I felt a bit uncomfortable with the idea but I did it and it was a very moving experience.  People there were very moved by the readings and it was an incredibly powerful way to share the stories of the refugees and to bring more awareness to the issue.

I was playing at the Festival of Voice and it was time for me to start taking a stand for these people who had been detained indefinitely for 4 and a half years in terrible conditions. So this was when I started to dedicate one of my songs to the refugees.  The song is called  “Cross to Bear” and I sang it for the first time with real purpose. Then something happened in August….I liked a post on Ruth’s facebook page and it was a video of a song played at a protest in Melbourne.  The video was written by a refugee on Manus, “Moz”  and a lady in Melbourne called Dr Emma Obrien who had a recording studio recorded the song with a bunch of amazing musicians.  The song is called “All the Same”  

I received a friend request from ‘Moz’ and we started chatting, I was scared because I had only heard about the refugees being terrorists and criminals on the news although I knew that couldn’t be true.  I found myself chatting with this beautiful, charming courteous intelligent young man who was in a terrible situation.  We talked about music and shared songs and I realised then what Ruth was doing, she was being a voice for these innocent people who were not able to defend themselves from the lies and deceit of our government.  I found more friend requests coming in and I became more and more involved.

We arrived in Port Moresby on March 16th and then on Manus on March 17th.  From the moment we arrived to the moment we left we were taken care of by the refugees, they organised a place to stay and they brought us food everyday (from their own rations) and they joined us for music and they sat and shared their stories – it was heart breaking and heart warming at the same time.

Here is a preview of our documentary, thank you to Tim Maisey for filming and editing and thank you to Dave Anger for recording and mixing the song while I was in Tasmania last month.

 

I had to do something – I’m an artist (singer/songwriter) and that’s my job to ask the tough questions.

So before I had time to even think about what I was doing I had started the crowd funder to go to Manus.  Donations came in quickly then an incredibly unbelievable thing happened while I was on tour in NSW. While in Gosford I met a total stranger at a coffee shop.  She told me later that she was so taken by my passion and drive to do something that she offered to pay the balance for the trip, it was a very emotional moment….I cried because someone actually believed in me and she cried with the gratitude that she could help.  It was a moment in time that I couldn’t have organised if I had tried…..the stars were aligned and I was going to Manus. Below is a reflection that I wrote on the way home from Brisbane.

5 DAYS NOT 5 YEARS ON MANUS REFLECTION

We’re on our way home and I just don’t know where to start. There’s just so much to process and right now I am filled with rage and compassion all at the same time. I can’t imagine the torture these guys have endured and I can’t imagine the pain they are carrying. I am amazed they still have the warmth in their hearts to greet us after all that they have endured under our government our sovereign nation under the guise of our National Anthem which use the words “with those who come across the seas we’ve boundless plains to share”.

Today on our last day William (name changed) came and his story is tragic. He was flown to Darwin for a small infection on his wrist then back to Manus where he waited a year to have the operation in Port Moresby. He said the doctor said it would be back to normal in 6 weeks. The doctor cut the nerves in his wrist and his hand is now paralysed. He is in pain all the time and he takes Tremedol, panadeine forte and anti depressants and 2 other medications for his stomach, kidneys and liver. It’s been 12 months since the operation and he no longer has the use of his left hand and he feels he is half a man now. He is 31 years old and he has children back in his homeland in Iraq. He came to the Hotel to give us some discs with x-rays and medical records, for me to pass on to the person coordinating all the medical misconduct cases.

He is so traumatised by it all that he can hardly function. He’s a beautiful kind grateful young man and as I sit next to him to listen to his story I am filled again with shame of the government that we have accepted as our leaders.

There is no leadership in this government, no leadership traits; honesty and integrity, commitment and passion, good communication, accountability, delegation and empowerment, creativity and innovation. I saw more leadership in all of these young men, they are all incredibly smart but they are more than that they have courage and wisdom beyond their years. They have open hearts despite having it sliced into so many piecesby the systematic torture that they have endured on a daily basis for 5 years. Every part of their being has been shattered into many pieces and thrown into a hole so dark and deep that any regular person would never have survived. Yet these guys have managed to salvage the shards and found a way to hold them together and maintain integrity and generosity for others. They carry a huge amount of the guilt and blame themselves for what is happening to them.

They told me how each night 80% of the men can’t sleep because as soon as they put their heads on the pillow the pain of torture runs out of control, regrets and what if’s keep running round and round and they just can’t sleep. Some of them sleep sat up. Farvard said ‘I can’t sleep lying down but I can’t get up because I am so tired then around 4 – 5 am I fall asleep till lunchtime’ …..approx 80% of them live like this and have done for the past 5 years.

Lukini lodge was a good choice because the men were willing to come to visit us. Lukini lodge was in town and the men don’t usually go into town on Saturday or Sunday or after 5pm each evening because it’s not safe. There is a big problem with alcoholism amongst the locals and robbery is the main problem. It’s a bit different to Australia because if you don’t hand over your money or phone there is a high chance that they will knife you.

Each day new men arrived and shared their pain, they all had the same disposition. They sat politely in the chair or on the edge of the bed, shoulders slightly hunched, head tilted slightly forwards. As the stories unfolded of the torture they had endured and the pain they had experienced I found myself sitting helpless. They all began with the same words. We have been here almost 5 years, not 1 day, not 5 days, not 3 months not 8 months but 5 years and some of them would say the actual number of days. Then they would say again 5 years almost 5 years holding out their hand with 4 fingers and a thumb showing.

Hazara believed that the Australian people hated them and he said “we thought Australia was different to where we fled from, but they hate us”. When I explained that many people didn’t know the truth about Manus and that the government had been lying to its people for the past 5 years he was shocked. It was the first time that he had heard that, he really believed that everyone knew and that they were all filled with anger and hatred towards all refugees.

Some of the guys actually believed that the guards, teachers and caseworkers were an example of all Australians. The guards were all horrible, abusive and total rednecks. The refugees believed that this must be what all Australian’s are like. There were some really good teachers and caseworkers but they usually left because it was too traumatic to witness such inhumane conditions or they spoke up and were sacked. Many were cruel and very unkind. When the refugees went to the caseworker they felt they were not supported and they were left to feel like no one cared and no one could help them.

Najaed said we don’t want to go to Australia we hate Australians. Then there were the ones who know there are many wonderful people in Australia and that is was the government.

Something else I heard over and over again was we are dead, we are all dead inside and we have nothing left for them to take. I would say to them “yes I can see that, I can see the life has left, but in all of you I see a tiny sparkle in your eyes” and they would show me a huge smile. A huge smile. The guys I met all still had a glimmer of hope but there were many who didn’t come to the hotel too and I know there are many men staying in their rooms or in the camps feeling helpless and very depressed most of the time.

Sometimes when I was talking to some of the guys I felt like I was talking into air, air that was filled with no hope and I would feel this wall rise and I felt like an idiot. Like what am I saying? Nothing I say could possibly be of any help to them and I almost felt like I was needing to dig myself into a hole to get out of the mess I had gotten into.

I was explaining that we wanted to take footage and take it back to Australia and show the people what we have seen so that we can help shift their views. But I felt like my words were empty like what the hell can I do it’s 5 years too late. How many people have been before and said the same thing only to do nothing or have no impact no matter how many people they tried to talk to or write to. Because every time people take action the government tell more stories of boarder safety and terrorists and the red necks all jump up and follow the governments lead. The advocates are all called ‘do gooders’ and are shut down. Dutton changes tact and makes up new rules.

Isaac was there in 2013 and he watched as the Australian guards and PNG police for no reason attack his friend Reza Barati. Reza was tall and he looked strong and they “piled on him and beat him till he was dead” the refugee said he watched his friend get murdered by Australian guards and PNG police officers. This refugee was only 20 yrs old when he witnessed that by our government under our watch.
Isaac sits in the chair in the hotel room in Port Moresby. He has been living there for 9 mths. He went there after some refugees were offered the option to go there to “integrate”. That door closed very quickly and recently refugees were sent back to Manus. Isaac felt it would be a better option to go to Port Moresby to keep his mind busy. He works 14 hours a day 6 days a week for 200 kina (approx. $85).
He sits in the chair slightly hunched over and shoulders slightly forwards. He is 6’4” and he has a beautiful strong face and that same sparkle in his eyes. He tells the story from a place in him that is devoid of emotion, that’s how they all share their stories from a place that keeps them safe from the pain. Just enough expression to get our attention.

We need to be strong and we don’t want to burden them, Abdul said “it’s too much for people, many case workers and psychologists have left because they can’t cope.”

* I have changed the names of the guys to protect them from retribution or hindering their chance to go to the USA.

Here is the link to the full length documentary

Here’s Farhad Bandesh and myself having a bit of fun on Manus Island.

Where from here? Artist and Musician finding her path

On the home front I have been busy with gigs and a week after I got back from Manus Island I was asked to play at Arcadia Wines for Easter Sunday which was a real treat and I’ve come back with a new perspective on my work as a musician and artist.  It was lovely to catch up with Gaye and John again and to get back into the swing of my regular work if you know what I mean but I also have a new vigour and passion for my work.  I now know that I have to play my original songs when I perform and I am happy to do a mix of originals and covers for a 3 hour gig but I have to do my original music in the mix.  I know this means I won’t get some gigs because some venues think that the audience wants all covers and there are the venues who want musicians to play covers to entertain the audience as they slowly get drunk . This is not my opinion I have been told this by venues. The brief usually is to play covers and lift the beat towards the end of the night to get the punters buying more alcohol. It’s just how it is in the music industry in Australia. I’m not sure how it is overseas but I would love to find out one day.

The week after that I was booked to play at the Three Anchors where  I haven’t played for ages so that was a lot of fun too.  I am now gearing up for a couple of gigs in May and then it’s the Denmark Festival of Voice.     

Then my very very big news is that I am off to Townsville in August for the Townsville Cultural Festival. I will keep you posted on that news next.

 

More musical shenanigans!

It feel’s like it was only a few days ago that I was posting to my webpage and here I am again. I never know how to start my blog posts and I’m always trying to find different ways to get the conversation going, well, not quite conversation because it’s just me talking to my computer but I think you know what I mean.

It was great to play at the Albany Boatshed Markets at the beginning of the month because we got to play on the big stage in the far corner which has a fantastic mural on the wall. A couple of people I knew were there and they were kind enough to take some pictures of us playing. The Albany Boatshed Markets has been going for 10 years now and they have supported live music by booking a couple of acts every Sunday and paying them to play.  We also get some fruit and vegi’s, free coffee and a few other treats depending on who’s there. The same day Peter and I played at the Earl of Spencer Historic Inn and Restaurant so it was a full on day.  I was worried about losing my voice after 4 hours of singing but that was fine, however, my fingers were very sore by the end of the evening. There’s things that I had never anticipated that I would have to think about before I started this musical journey.

On October 14th I had my first house concert in Northam to look forward to.  Tonks is a lovely guy from Voice of the Avon 101.3FM community radio station who has been playing my tracks for the past 12 months after I submitted them to Amrap/Airit. Amrap Airit is a not for profit organisation that promotes and supports Australian Independent artists.  Each time an artist produces an album or EP they can submit a maximum of 3 tracks to Amrap Airit where they are then distributed to Community Radio stations across Australia. It’s a fantastic service and I have had a lot of airplay through this great initiative. I have had many radio interviews and I’ve been invited to many shows to play live, with the presenters that I have built relationships with. Many of them are passionate about music and and love to find new music to play on their shows so in effect their passion supports us to do what we are passionate about. It’s a win win for everyone involved!

Anyway I’ll get back to the House Concert in Northam.  Tonks was my host and we did the concert at his friend’s house Brett and Julie.  Gracie B is an up and coming local artist so she was my support act for the night.  She did a fantastic job and we played a few tunes together too, which was a lot of fun. She’s a lovely young lady only 13 years old and is a great musician. We had a great audience who thoroughly enjoyed themselves and Tonks wrote me a beautiful review for the House Concerts Australia Network page.

Here’s a glowing review from Tonks
“On the 14th October 2017, I hosted a house concert in Northam W.A. My choice of artist for this event was @Dawn Barrington – singer/songwriter from Denmark in WA. At Dawns suggestion I also engaged a young lass from York WA – Gracie B. Gracie is an up and coming singer/songwriter who is just starting out on her musical journey.  Gracie B started proceedings with a twenty minute set and then Dawn performed a forty minute set. We then had a feed (bbq) and both artists did another set each – and a jam session.

Dawn is a consummate musical professional, great entertainer and very nice person to boot. I could not have made a better choice for my first concert. Dawn enthralled the audience during the concert with original music and some covers – and had the audience singing along with her.  Gracie B showed why is she is an up and coming talent with her unique cover versions.  Both Dawn and Gracie met for the first time immediately prior to the concert – but you would not have known that if you were to judge by their jam session!.

This was the first house concert in Northam, but will not be the last. It was a very successful concert.” Allen Tonkin, Voice of the Avon 101.3 fm

I came home on Sunday to a house full of great friends which was very exciting because we catch up around 2 times per year and we met through music which is the most exciting part. I was so looking forward to catching up with these guys we always have the best time together and the best jams. On Sunday night we had the best jam in the history of humankind, I’m biased of course lol ;O)  The guys all play in a band and they brought some friends with them this time which made it all the more fun.

Then on Saturday October 21st Peter and I joined Luke Tulloch to play some tunes at the Baháulláh   200th anniversary Baha u allah shares the beautiful message of hope and enlightenment to all across the planet. It was a great afternoon at Mahsa Anderson’s home in Denmark WA.

This Sunday we will be doing a house concert in Warnbro at a private home. House concerts are really starting to take off here in Australia and House Concerts Australia is where you can sign up as a host or an artist.  It’s free to sign up as a host and you can invite artists from all across Australia to play in your home. It’s a great way to meet the artist and have an affordable fun evening for you and your family and friends.  In the next few months I have some local gigs and a few out of the box gigs and then it’s Xmas!!

Upcoming Eastern States tour
Yep I’m doing it again folks! 
This will be my third solo Eastern States tour in the past 18 months and this time I’m going to take the road north of Sydney although I haven’t decided how far yet or whether to do a U turn once I get to Upper Landsdowne and go southwardss. I have some bookings in Upper Landsdowne, NewcastleGosford and Sydney so far. I will keep you posted on the rest of the bookings when I get them.

Well that’s it from me for this month and I’ll be back next month with more shenanigans.  Over and out Folks!

It’s time for an update

I thought it was time for an update on what’s been happening the past few months. As soon as I got back from Kalgoorlie I started getting ready for a House Concert which is the first one that I have booked through House Concerts Australia.

It was at Arcadia Wines in Kendenup which is only an hour or so away from Denmark.  Gaye and John are a lovely couple and they have only had the cellar door open for the past 18 months and they are doing really well. They have award winning wines and I would personally recommend the aged Riesling. Gaye and John are lovers of live music and they are really passionate about having regular live music events which is awesome. All the tickets were sold and we all had a great night. The photo isn’t brilliant but it’s just evidence that I was there lol!

Then a couple of weeks later I took a trip up to the big smoke for a couple of gigs.  One in York which is about an hour east of Perth where I played at the Settlers House York, which is a beautiful old heritage building. York is the the first inland town Settled in WA.  We had a few drinks at the end of the night and I heard a few good ghost stories which was a bit unnerving.

On Sunday I played at Jackadders Music Club. I had a really warm welcome from Carmel and Ron and we had a lovely afternoon. It was great to hear the audience sing along to my original songs and the whole gig was recorded which was fantastic.

Next was one of my regular gigs at the Earl of Spencer in Albany. Peter Caron joined me on guitar and I love playing with Peter because we have a lot of fun and he adds lots of fancy guitar work to my songs, and the covers, that we do.  I usually do an even mix of originals and covers when I do pub gigs which is pretty cruisey and generally good fun.  Peter set up the video so we got some great footage of us playing too.

 

Then last but not least I did another house concert but this time in Manjimup at a beautiful historic building called Dingup House Bed and Breakfast which is managed by Chris and John.  Dingup House is one of the first houses built on the original town site of Manjimup until they moved the town a few kms down the road. Chris and John do a fantastic job there and we had a wonderful intimate evening with soup and song.  The photo isn’t the best but it just gives you an idea of the set up there.  Half the guests stayed the night and the rooms are all beautifully presented with heritage style beds and lovely patchwork bed covers. I would highly recommend a stay there if you’re travelling through that neck of the woods.

 

WHAT’S NEXT

My son has gone to New York for a school trip so my husband and I have decided to go for a little holiday across to Augusta and Margaret River and I’m going to play at the Goodfellas i cafe in Margaret River while we’re there. I know what you’re thinking….can’t she just have one weekend without playing music…and the answer is most definitely not….lol! It just so happens our friends own Goodfellas and I just love playing there.

Then the following week I’ll be doing a double gig with Peter Caron which means we will be at the Albany Boatshed Markets in the Morning and at The Earl of Spencer in the evening.  I’m really looking forward to doing a house concert in Northam in October.  I’m also busy planning another Eastern States tour for Jan/Feb or next year which is very time consuming and fun at the same time.  I’ve also been busy writing songs for recording next year.  That’s it for now folks!  Stay warm and dry in this crazy weather if you live on this side of the planet and down this far below the equator.

 

Goldfields Adventure

I had a fantastic time in Kalgoorlie!

It was my first ever visit and it was soooo worth the drive. I took the coastal route to Esperance then the Coolgardie Esperance road to Kalgoorlie. If you do it in one hit it takes almost 10 hours but I stopped in Esperance for a night each way so I had a decent break.

I have been utilising Air BnB a lot lately because it’s a great way to go on the road and get low cost accommodation and to be honest it makes it possible for me to take my music further afield. However, there is a down side, you never know what you’re going to get. So you just have to go with the flow and be thankful that you have a bed and shower and it’s alway clean and tidy. I had booked in at the Forest House Air BnB and little did I know that I would be sharing the venue with 11 other young men and that it would be a hostel type setup. So you can imagine my surprise when I found out that the bathrooms were all shared which wouldn’t have been so bad if there had been other women staying. But I was on the only woman, so everyday I felt like I was walking into the men’s bathroom. They were all young guys (except for one) and they would stand at the sink half clad, having a shave or wash, and we would give each the obligatory nod “how you goin'” type thing and continue on our way.  All jokes aside they were very respectful and lovely guys, but another concern came to mind when I realised they were all young. Oh bugger! I thought, they’re going to be wanting to party every night and I really needed my sleep so that I could be awake and focused for my gigs, I mean I’m not getting any younger! Well it turned out that they were all fly in fly out (fifo) workers and they were working 12 hour shifts from 6am to 6pm and didn’t get home till after 6pm and they were all in bed by 9pm!  I was already out preparing for my gigs by that time and I was probably the noisey one not getting back till after midnight. So that was an interesting role reversal if ever I saw one.

E13 Session at Burt St Shop, Kalgoorlie, Photo courtesy Billy Ray Stokes

I found out at 5.30am the following morning that the train line was 50 metres from my bedroom window and the train station was a few doors down. The big diesel passenger and freight train idled in the station for around 20 mins and then every 30 mins after that another train whistled past for the next few hours. You can all see where this is heading can’t you? It’s all the things that rock and roll stories are made off….LIVING THE DREAM!! only it’s ‘FOLK N ROLL’ all the way for me folks! :O)

I didn’t get much sleep the first night to my surprise! — not — but it didn’t matter because I could sleep in for as long as I liked the next day the gig wasn’t till 7pm at night.  However, the phone rang at 9am the next morning, it was Betina from ABC Kalgoorlie radio and she had heard I was in town touring my album and that I had come all the way from Denmark WA. She wondered if I wanted to go in for an interview and to play a song.  I was like “yeah sure that would be awesome! What time did you want me in?”, “Would 10am be ok with you?” she replied.  “Yeah sure! I lied”, that would great! So I jumped out of bed got my act together tuned my guitar gargled some warm water so I could sing without croaking and headed off to the studio.  I found the studio in the nick of time after driving round town trying to find it only to find out that I had parked right outside on my first time round.

It was lovely to meet Betina the presenter and it turned out her parents were living in Denmark. That evening I had a great gig at 3b Boutique Bar where I met some lovely people and sold some CD’s which was awesome. It’s not easy going to a brand new venue to set up your PA and play and the 3b Boutique staff were fantastic and so accommodating.  The following night I played at the secret location on Burt Street. Ruben Wills from E13 Sessions has been doing some fantastic work up there in Kalgoorlie WA. He is passionate about supporting original live music and giving artists an opportunity to play their original music to an attentive audience.  It’s a fantastic event and we had the most wonderful audience, it was very much like a house concert, intimate and very engaging. It was a sellout and myself and two other great local artists played two 25 minute sets each. Ruben had organised a professional sound guy and photographer, so all we had to do, was show up with our guitar and plug in to play.  I did a lot of story telling between songs and it was great to have the whole room singing along to my songs.  I went away with a very warm glow that night.

All in all Kalgoorlie is very interesting place to visit, it’s quite a culture shock from the regular country towns and I don’t know if if was just me, or fact, but there seemed to be a lot of men there.  I mean a lot of men….like way more men than women :O)  Not only that but I couldn’t help notice the high volume of white dual cab ute’s with an orange light on top.  They all seemed to be driving around as if on a mission as part of a secret covert operation, ok my imagination is getting a bit carried away now……not to forget that they were all clad in the Aussie safety gear which is  fluorescent orange or yellow and blue blue in colour. The supermarkets were full of these solo men doing their shopping and I have say that on the whole they were very friendly too.  But I couldn’t help feeling that I was on different paradigm to the one that I have become accustomed to in Denmark. I mean we hear all about the mining boom and the hoards of money being made but I didn’t get the sense that people were drowning in wealth.  I got the sense that they were all working very hard and doing their best to enhance the community.  All in all I found Kalgoorlie people very friendly and I felt a real sense of community there too.

I had a fantastic time, I met some lovely people and I sold a heap of albums and all too quickly it was time to get back on the road.

My next stop is Kendenup next Friday where I will be doing a House Concert at Arcadia Wines.

 

ALBUM LAUNCH at the Denmark Festival of Voice!

I will be launching my Album “When Did it Change” at this year.s Denmark Festival of Voice which is only a few weeks away on June 3rd and 4th.  The whole of Denmark comes alive with music, poetry, spoken word and other creative collaborations. The festival has been going since 2004 and this is the 4th time I have had the opportunity to play there.  This year I will be joined by Peter Caron on guitar.

“When did it change?” was recorded in February of this year in Denmark with Denmark musicians and a Denmark raised producer.  When did it Change? is a my third CD release in as many years. This album is largely autobiographical and includes new songs written to reflect a time of considerable change in my life for which music has been the catalyst.  It also dips into the past by reworking some songs from my EP “Voices”.

 

I will be playing at Mrs Jones Cafe on Mt Shadforth Rd and the Arthouse Cafe, Denmark Arts, 2A Strickland Street.

REVIEWS

“The irrepressible Folk artist Dawn Barrington is a truly inspirational Musician. ….. Dawn has recorded and independently released her second album ‘ When did it change ‘ and it is astounding how far that this songwriter has progressed in so few years. With the courage of her convictions and some help from a core of exemplary musicians (Tony King, Co- Producer and Guitars, to name just one) Dawn has crafted a wonderful Folk recording. ‘It was you‘ and ‘Cross to bear‘ are two of my favourites, both songs verging on folk rock, propelled along by robust melodies and exquisite musicianship. ‘A young lady i once knew‘ is another highlight on this album, as are the inspired covers of Leaving on a Jet plane and Blowing in the wind. In fact ‘When did it change‘ sounds very much like a sixties recording, even without the covers just mentioned, yet it still manages to be of the here and now, Tony King’s guitar work has a lot to do with that, though i think it has more to do with the songwriters own influences and her modern interpretations of a bygone era. In a nutshell Dawn Barrington has found her voice.
I truly enjoyed listening to ‘ When did it change ‘ and wish Dawn the greatest success for this formidable album and her fledgling career.”  Pete Williams – Presenter 3NRG 99.3FM, Sunbury, VIC

“Dawn Barrington is a folk singer from Western Australia and I became aware of her music in September of 2014 when I downloaded her track ‘Voices’ from AMRAP. Early 2015 saw the release of the single “Women of War” to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Gallipoli and put the war in a perspective not often acknowledged, that of the women who either took part directly or who stepped up to support the war effort from Australia as well as generally keeping the home fires burning.

I would describe Dawn’s music as a set of carefully crafted lyrics’ riding an original meandering tune to simultaneously arrive at a point.

A few months back, Dawn toured the east coast for the first time and I was lucky enough to have her as a guest on Rare Traxx & Eclectic where she sang live in the studio. Later that same week, I went to the Illawarra Folk Club to see Dawn perform live. I witnessed a very warm exchange between artist and audience which I thoroughly enjoyed.

I look forward to Dawns next visit and the possibility of seeing her perform live at a house concert venue.” Michael Hayes – Producer 2MCR 100.3FM, MacArthur, NSW

“The album as a whole has captured your energy and creativity.” Ruth Halbert, Denmark WA

“Had a great interview with Dawn Barrington a few months back. She has a deep soulful voice with achoustic rythm and meaning. You can tell she’s a friend by her lyrics. Great Music. And I’m Promoting Her. It would be so great to see her at TribeLive.” Ian Knott, Presenter, Tribe 91.1FM, Wilunga, SA