Gigs

Taking flight – Festival fun

Denmark Festival of Voice 2018
The sun was shining and there was a buzz in the air in Denmark as the Festival of Voice got into full swing. Our beautiful little town came alive with song, poetry and music scattered in every venue across town. I played at Mrs Jones Cafe on Saturday and Sunday.

On Saturday early evening Tim and I did a documentary screening of “Music from Manus – 5 Days not 5 Years” which was very well attended. Once again we had a fantastic response and people really engaged with the information being shared on the screen and thanks to all those who signed my petition and put money in the tin afterwards.  I have been able to send some money to help a refugee get some urgently needed dental treatment today as a result of the money raised at the screening.

Thanks to the Denmark Yoga community for raising funds and to all the individuals who have approached me in the street to donate too, their money also was able to support the dental costs. We have a few more local screenings, one in Denmark and one in Walpole then the next ones will be when I go over east in August.

So life has been changing dramatically for me in recent months with so many more engagements than ever before.  My music career has overlapped with my activism work and my purpose has become more clear.  I am passionate about music and writing and recording songs and performing which always comes first.  However, alongside that is my desire to see an end to the offshore detention of innocent people.  I am passionate about that too and I am honoured that I can use my music profile to raise awareness and support change.

Gigging Land
In the next few months I will be doing my usual gigs and they include my first time at Freehand Wines right here in Denmark and then I have been asked to perform a the Truffle Kerfuffle in Manjimup being organised by Kelsi Miller Good nights Bunbury on Sunday 24th which is fantastic!.  A week before I go to Townsville I will be playing at one of my favourite local spots….well almost local….in Albany called Six Degrees which will be a great warm up for the pending trip.

Next Album in the making
I have a heap of new songs that I want to get onto my next album so I’ve booked a weekend in September to record the first few songs and it’s wonderful to have Tony King there to do lots of the instrumentation and Al Smith from Bergerk! studios is coming down to set up his recording gear in my music studio. I’m going to ask a bunch of locals to participate too so it’s really going to be another local affair.  I’ll keep you posted on that one folks.

Townsville Cultural Festival
July is a month where I will be getting organised for the biggest event for  “Dawn Barrington Music” this year and that is that I will be performing at the Townsville Cultural Fest! This will be my very first visit to Townsville and it’s going to be awesome and especially lovely to catch up with Kallidad who are one of the headliners.  This is an incredible festival where gender equity is a priority and all cultures are recognised in one big celebration.  The organiser of this festival Farvardin Daliri and his team have been making this happen for many years and he is a great advocate for cultural diversity in his community and I am very looking forward to meeting him and his team in August for this fantastic weekend.

Documentary screenings
After the Townsville Festival I will be going down to NSW to do a heap of screenings down the NSW coast in Newcastle, Gosford, Sydney x 2, Wollongong and Eurobodalla. I am very excited because there is such enthusiasm by the people hosting them to make it happen and I will get to meet all the fellow activists/advocates over there who I have been conversing and liaising with on facebook for the past 18 months or so.

I am now keen to spread the word far and wide so please feel free to share the documentary and if you want me to do a screening in your town please make contact with me because I am very happy to come and do that.

 

 

 

Music with a mission

I am sat at my computer 3 weeks after returning home from a 9,000km round trip that has changed me forever.  I had no idea where I was headed emotionally and physically and I actually went with no expectations, but one thing I knew for sure and that is my life would never be the same again.

There has been much controversy over the offshore processing of refugees on Manus and Nauru. I wanted to find a way to seek the truth and I was feeling helpless and overwhelmed as I watched the cruel regime of our government and it’s treatment of refugees. So I planned to go to Manus to play music and document the trip…Why? because I wanted to use music to connect with the friends that I had made there and then show the world that the men on Manus are just regular human beings like us. Like mine and your sons, our brothers or cousins. Thank you to local film maker Tim Maisey for trusting in me and taking the journey with me and for doing a fantastic job of documenting the experience.

How did I get involved in this journey?

Around 2 years ago I noticed that my very good friend and textile artist Ruth Halbert was becoming more involved in the very politicised issue of offshore processing on Manus Island and Nauru.  I wasn’t really aware of what it was all about and after all I was way too busy with my music career and my family to fit anything else into my life.  But then she started writing letters to the Prime Minster Malcom Turnball every day….I mean every day.  She was writing for every woman, man and child in offshore detention.  I was slowly starting to notice more and more facebook posts that were damning of the Australian Government and the name Peter Dutton kept coming up.  I don’t have a TV so I had not idea who he was but I could see he was creating a few problems. Then in June 2017 Ruth was asked to contribute her work to the Denmark Festival of Voice, so she asked members of the community if they would read aloud the letters for 30 mins at a time.  So i put my hand up to be one of the readers and I felt a bit uncomfortable with the idea but I did it and it was a very moving experience.  People there were very moved by the readings and it was an incredibly powerful way to share the stories of the refugees and to bring more awareness to the issue.

I was playing at the Festival of Voice and it was time for me to start taking a stand for these people who had been detained indefinitely for 4 and a half years in terrible conditions. So this was when I started to dedicate one of my songs to the refugees.  The song is called  “Cross to Bear” and I sang it for the first time with real purpose. Then something happened in August….I liked a post on Ruth’s facebook page and it was a video of a song played at a protest in Melbourne.  The video was written by a refugee on Manus, “Moz”  and a lady in Melbourne called Dr Emma Obrien who had a recording studio recorded the song with a bunch of amazing musicians.  The song is called “All the Same”  

I received a friend request from ‘Moz’ and we started chatting, I was scared because I had only heard about the refugees being terrorists and criminals on the news although I knew that couldn’t be true.  I found myself chatting with this beautiful, charming courteous intelligent young man who was in a terrible situation.  We talked about music and shared songs and I realised then what Ruth was doing, she was being a voice for these innocent people who were not able to defend themselves from the lies and deceit of our government.  I found more friend requests coming in and I became more and more involved.

We arrived in Port Moresby on March 16th and then on Manus on March 17th.  From the moment we arrived to the moment we left we were taken care of by the refugees, they organised a place to stay and they brought us food everyday (from their own rations) and they joined us for music and they sat and shared their stories – it was heart breaking and heart warming at the same time.

Here is a preview of our documentary, thank you to Tim Maisey for filming and editing and thank you to Dave Anger for recording and mixing the song while I was in Tasmania last month.

 

I had to do something – I’m an artist (singer/songwriter) and that’s my job to ask the tough questions.

So before I had time to even think about what I was doing I had started the crowd funder to go to Manus.  Donations came in quickly then an incredibly unbelievable thing happened while I was on tour in NSW. While in Gosford I met a total stranger at a coffee shop.  She told me later that she was so taken by my passion and drive to do something that she offered to pay the balance for the trip, it was a very emotional moment….I cried because someone actually believed in me and she cried with the gratitude that she could help.  It was a moment in time that I couldn’t have organised if I had tried…..the stars were aligned and I was going to Manus. Below is a reflection that I wrote on the way home from Brisbane.

5 DAYS NOT 5 YEARS ON MANUS REFLECTION

We’re on our way home and I just don’t know where to start. There’s just so much to process and right now I am filled with rage and compassion all at the same time. I can’t imagine the torture these guys have endured and I can’t imagine the pain they are carrying. I am amazed they still have the warmth in their hearts to greet us after all that they have endured under our government our sovereign nation under the guise of our National Anthem which use the words “with those who come across the seas we’ve boundless plains to share”.

Today on our last day William (name changed) came and his story is tragic. He was flown to Darwin for a small infection on his wrist then back to Manus where he waited a year to have the operation in Port Moresby. He said the doctor said it would be back to normal in 6 weeks. The doctor cut the nerves in his wrist and his hand is now paralysed. He is in pain all the time and he takes Tremedol, panadeine forte and anti depressants and 2 other medications for his stomach, kidneys and liver. It’s been 12 months since the operation and he no longer has the use of his left hand and he feels he is half a man now. He is 31 years old and he has children back in his homeland in Iraq. He came to the Hotel to give us some discs with x-rays and medical records, for me to pass on to the person coordinating all the medical misconduct cases.

He is so traumatised by it all that he can hardly function. He’s a beautiful kind grateful young man and as I sit next to him to listen to his story I am filled again with shame of the government that we have accepted as our leaders.

There is no leadership in this government, no leadership traits; honesty and integrity, commitment and passion, good communication, accountability, delegation and empowerment, creativity and innovation. I saw more leadership in all of these young men, they are all incredibly smart but they are more than that they have courage and wisdom beyond their years. They have open hearts despite having it sliced into so many piecesby the systematic torture that they have endured on a daily basis for 5 years. Every part of their being has been shattered into many pieces and thrown into a hole so dark and deep that any regular person would never have survived. Yet these guys have managed to salvage the shards and found a way to hold them together and maintain integrity and generosity for others. They carry a huge amount of the guilt and blame themselves for what is happening to them.

They told me how each night 80% of the men can’t sleep because as soon as they put their heads on the pillow the pain of torture runs out of control, regrets and what if’s keep running round and round and they just can’t sleep. Some of them sleep sat up. Farvard said ‘I can’t sleep lying down but I can’t get up because I am so tired then around 4 – 5 am I fall asleep till lunchtime’ …..approx 80% of them live like this and have done for the past 5 years.

Lukini lodge was a good choice because the men were willing to come to visit us. Lukini lodge was in town and the men don’t usually go into town on Saturday or Sunday or after 5pm each evening because it’s not safe. There is a big problem with alcoholism amongst the locals and robbery is the main problem. It’s a bit different to Australia because if you don’t hand over your money or phone there is a high chance that they will knife you.

Each day new men arrived and shared their pain, they all had the same disposition. They sat politely in the chair or on the edge of the bed, shoulders slightly hunched, head tilted slightly forwards. As the stories unfolded of the torture they had endured and the pain they had experienced I found myself sitting helpless. They all began with the same words. We have been here almost 5 years, not 1 day, not 5 days, not 3 months not 8 months but 5 years and some of them would say the actual number of days. Then they would say again 5 years almost 5 years holding out their hand with 4 fingers and a thumb showing.

Hazara believed that the Australian people hated them and he said “we thought Australia was different to where we fled from, but they hate us”. When I explained that many people didn’t know the truth about Manus and that the government had been lying to its people for the past 5 years he was shocked. It was the first time that he had heard that, he really believed that everyone knew and that they were all filled with anger and hatred towards all refugees.

Some of the guys actually believed that the guards, teachers and caseworkers were an example of all Australians. The guards were all horrible, abusive and total rednecks. The refugees believed that this must be what all Australian’s are like. There were some really good teachers and caseworkers but they usually left because it was too traumatic to witness such inhumane conditions or they spoke up and were sacked. Many were cruel and very unkind. When the refugees went to the caseworker they felt they were not supported and they were left to feel like no one cared and no one could help them.

Najaed said we don’t want to go to Australia we hate Australians. Then there were the ones who know there are many wonderful people in Australia and that is was the government.

Something else I heard over and over again was we are dead, we are all dead inside and we have nothing left for them to take. I would say to them “yes I can see that, I can see the life has left, but in all of you I see a tiny sparkle in your eyes” and they would show me a huge smile. A huge smile. The guys I met all still had a glimmer of hope but there were many who didn’t come to the hotel too and I know there are many men staying in their rooms or in the camps feeling helpless and very depressed most of the time.

Sometimes when I was talking to some of the guys I felt like I was talking into air, air that was filled with no hope and I would feel this wall rise and I felt like an idiot. Like what am I saying? Nothing I say could possibly be of any help to them and I almost felt like I was needing to dig myself into a hole to get out of the mess I had gotten into.

I was explaining that we wanted to take footage and take it back to Australia and show the people what we have seen so that we can help shift their views. But I felt like my words were empty like what the hell can I do it’s 5 years too late. How many people have been before and said the same thing only to do nothing or have no impact no matter how many people they tried to talk to or write to. Because every time people take action the government tell more stories of boarder safety and terrorists and the red necks all jump up and follow the governments lead. The advocates are all called ‘do gooders’ and are shut down. Dutton changes tact and makes up new rules.

Isaac was there in 2013 and he watched as the Australian guards and PNG police for no reason attack his friend Reza Barati. Reza was tall and he looked strong and they “piled on him and beat him till he was dead” the refugee said he watched his friend get murdered by Australian guards and PNG police officers. This refugee was only 20 yrs old when he witnessed that by our government under our watch.
Isaac sits in the chair in the hotel room in Port Moresby. He has been living there for 9 mths. He went there after some refugees were offered the option to go there to “integrate”. That door closed very quickly and recently refugees were sent back to Manus. Isaac felt it would be a better option to go to Port Moresby to keep his mind busy. He works 14 hours a day 6 days a week for 200 kina (approx. $85).
He sits in the chair slightly hunched over and shoulders slightly forwards. He is 6’4” and he has a beautiful strong face and that same sparkle in his eyes. He tells the story from a place in him that is devoid of emotion, that’s how they all share their stories from a place that keeps them safe from the pain. Just enough expression to get our attention.

We need to be strong and we don’t want to burden them, Abdul said “it’s too much for people, many case workers and psychologists have left because they can’t cope.”

* I have changed the names of the guys to protect them from retribution or hindering their chance to go to the USA.

Here is the link to the full length documentary

Here’s Farhad Bandesh and myself having a bit of fun on Manus Island.

Where from here? Artist and Musician finding her path

On the home front I have been busy with gigs and a week after I got back from Manus Island I was asked to play at Arcadia Wines for Easter Sunday which was a real treat and I’ve come back with a new perspective on my work as a musician and artist.  It was lovely to catch up with Gaye and John again and to get back into the swing of my regular work if you know what I mean but I also have a new vigour and passion for my work.  I now know that I have to play my original songs when I perform and I am happy to do a mix of originals and covers for a 3 hour gig but I have to do my original music in the mix.  I know this means I won’t get some gigs because some venues think that the audience wants all covers and there are the venues who want musicians to play covers to entertain the audience as they slowly get drunk . This is not my opinion I have been told this by venues. The brief usually is to play covers and lift the beat towards the end of the night to get the punters buying more alcohol. It’s just how it is in the music industry in Australia. I’m not sure how it is overseas but I would love to find out one day.

The week after that I was booked to play at the Three Anchors where  I haven’t played for ages so that was a lot of fun too.  I am now gearing up for a couple of gigs in May and then it’s the Denmark Festival of Voice.     

Then my very very big news is that I am off to Townsville in August for the Townsville Cultural Festival. I will keep you posted on that news next.

 

NSW and Tasmania tour and the Day before departure

The day before I left for NSW I did a performance at the Denmark Arts Markets, it was a fabulous morning and if you have never been to the Arts Markets you must schedule a trip to Denmark WA to coincide with an Arts Markets day. They have live music playing all day and lots of market stalls with hand made products, food and more.

I played a full set and at the end of my set I decided to dedicate the last two songs to the refugees on Manus Island and Nauru. I offered the audience an opportunity to get up on stage with me to stand with the Women, men and children in offshore detention, it was quite moving as people joined me and a very special moment indeed when I sang my new song “Fly Free Little Bird”

I was away for just over 3 weeks and I’ve been home a week or so and it’s been go go go. I had a fantastic tour and there were many highlights and a few lowlights of course but it wouldn’t be rock ‘n’ roll if  it was all plain sailing.  After spending a few days with my 2nd cousin in Gladesville (thanks Paul and Anne) I went to Gosford via Chatswood.  John Regan has been a great supporter of my music and it’s always great to go to the studio at Northside Sydney Radio 99.3 fm to see him for an interview and a quick catch up.  Then I met Father Rod Bower from the Anglican Parish Church for lunch in Gosford.  I have been following him for a little while now and I am very interested in the work he is doing to support the refugees in offshore detention and I just love all of his work and the way he goes about it. It was fantastic to meet him and have a chat about all matters needing our attention and compassion. Then I remembered that I had a radio interview booked for 2 BOB 104.7fm  to promote the gig in Upper Lansdowne. I managed to be ready at my phone in time for that then off I went to my next stop.

I headed over to the Rhythm Hut where I was booked to play that night and what a fantastic venue it is. Louise Sawilejskij is the lady at the helm of the Rhythm Hut and she and her team of volunteers bring it all together.  They have a fantastic venue where you can stay and a shared meal  is offered and you get to sit and chat with all the volunteers and other musicians. I was fortunate enough to be there when Nathan Cavaleri was playing so I got to have chat with him and see his gig on the Friday night, he’s a lovely young man and of course I had no idea of who he was until after the event.  Louise did give me a bit of his story just when he arrived but it really didn’t sink in until I googled him a week or so later and wow! what a surprise I had to see his incredible story.

The next day I made my way up to Upper Lansdowne where I was booked to play as a support act for Dan Walsh a great up and coming Banjo player from the UK.  I played a set and then he played and then we played a few songs together which was a lot of fun…I just love to collaborate and I can’t believe that he

let me improvise some lead on his song…he’s  a very brave man lol…. Upper Landsdowne Memorial Hall is a fantastic venue run by the local community it was a fantastic night, we had a full house and a lot of fun. The very next day I had to get back to Newcastle for a gig at the Lass O’Gowrie which was one of the low lights so I won’t talk about that one  grrrrr. Then on the same day I made my way to Glenorie where I stayed at the lovely Dimitra’s (a friend of a friend) for 3 days and for a bit of rest before I headed off to Tasmania. I was well looked after and really sorry that I missed my friends who usually stay there but hopefully I will get to see them soon.  They are also musicians and they are aways on the road.  I’m afraid the photos aren’t very good but they are just evidence that I  was there and having a great time!

I stayed for a night at a friend’s house in Sydney then I went over to Tasmania for 10 days which was organised by John Lay from Voice of the Midlands 97.1fm.

John organised the tour and initially he was planning on booking 5 to 6 gigs but it ended up only being 3 which was not the best but that’s rock and roll too folks sometimes things don’t go the way you planned. I played at the Colebrook TavernMidland Hotel in Oatlands and Ye Olde Buckland Inn in Buckland which was the high light and I also did a radio interview which is always a lot of fun too.

However, I managed to catch up with the lovely Dave Anger who is also a radio presenter at Voice of the Midlands and we got to spend some time together and he had his home studio set up where I recorded a demo of my song “Fly free little bird” which I have dedicated to the refugees on Manus Island and Nauru. It was a very special moment and I am very grateful to Dave for the opportunity to get a demo down.

What’s Next?

Next Friday 9th March I will be playing at the Bunbury Regional Art Gallery as part of the Bunbury Goodnights live music series.  I will be playing from 12 noon till 2pm and then I will be heading over the Mandurah to do a House Concert at Westy’s BnB which is run by the lovely Be Westbrook.  We met through House Concerts Australia.  House Concerts is another great way to listen to live music and get up close and personal with the musician, they are great fun and I always meet lovely people who really appreciate music.

The very big news is that I have been selected to play at the Townsville Cultural Fest in Townsville August of this year.  This is very exciting for me because it’s not easy getting into big festivals and I have been selected because the organiser likes my work which is fantastic.  This is an all ages all genres festival and a celebration of all cultures.  My songs reflect a lot of who I am and the things that matter to me the most, so to be selected based on what I write about makes it all worth while.

I do have some more very exciting news which I will share with you very soon. So watch this space folks!!

 

 

Finishing off the Year and bring in 2018

Well it’s that time of year again and what a year it has been.  I spend way too much time each day thinking that I am not doing enough in one way or another and yet when I look back on the past 12 months I can see that I’ve done more than enough to fill anyone’s calendar.

This year started with the production of my 2nd album, how could I forget that memorable 10 days? Toby came down from Perth to set up his studio in my music room and a bunch of amazing artists and friends came and put down their tracks. Tony King my teacher and mentor and Toby should get the most credit because they work so well together and I just love what they come up with everytime. While Toby finished the mixing off I went to Sydney for another tour where I got to play at some amazing places and meet some wonderful people.  It was a huge sense of achievement too because it’s not easy to go off on your own to play at venues that you’ve never played before, because you never know what reception you’re going to get.  However, had a fantastic time and I got to meet some lovely friends there including fellow musician friends who came to see me play.  

This year I have clocked up a pile of gigs too and Peter Caron joined me for  many of them which was lots of fun. It’s always good to share the stage and have a good laugh on the way home at all the things that happened throughout the night.  Thanks Peter for such a great year of musical shenanigans.  We also played at the Denmark Festival of Voice where I launched my Album “When did it change?“.

This year was also my year of House Concerts, I did more house concerts this year than I have ever done and it’s such a great experience.  I met a lot of lovely people and learnt a lot about myself and how I want to present my act.  What do I want to share with the audience? How do I do that in a way that is complementary to my music and staying true to who I am as an artist?  They are questions I ask myself everyday.  I guess I’m just working it all out as I go along.  I did house concerts in Denmark, Sydney, Kalgoorlie, Manjimup, Kendenup, Northam and Warnbro and I’m looking forward to doing my first one for 2018 in Mandurah in March.

One of the biggest things that happened for me this year was that my son Andrew went on a school trip to New York and he’s only 15 years old.  He was so excited and so were we but I was so anxious too. It was his first time away from home for such a long time and he was going to NEW YORK….I mean isn’t that the place where all sorts of terrible things happen…yeah I know I’m being a bit pathetic, but the most ridiculous things go through your head when your only child is leaving the country for a few weeks without you.  He had the time of his life and came back a new young man glowing with confidence and self esteem that no school lesson or other experience could have offered.

Finally this year was my year of many radio interviews too, I am very grateful to all the lovely presenters who invited me into their studio to talk about me and my music and especially to those who offered me an opportunity to play a song too. Not to forget the phone interviews too. They include John Regan from Northside Radio 99.3 fm, John Tonks from Voice of the Avon 101.3 fm , James Monte from Monte Famous Mondays,  John Maddison and David Sims from Albany Community Radio 109.3 fm, Chris Spencer from Australian Sporgasbord ORC fm,  ABC Kalgoorlie fm  and ABC Albany. It’s fantastic to have the opportunity to play and put your music out there.  I would like to make a special thank you you Pete Williams from Sunbury fm 99.3 fm’s “Made in the Shade” for the fantastic review of my recently released album “When did it Change?”.  It was incredibly exciting to receive such a wonderful review which I have pinned at the top of my facebook page and it’s also become a wonderful resource that I can use when applying for gigs, festivals and other events. I want to thank all the presenters who continue to play my music too, it’s only because of you guys that independent artists can get heard by a larger audience.  I would just like to thank a lovely presenter that is all the way across the states in Tasmania who plays my tracks Dave Anger from WNCM100.3 fm .  Thanks Dave and I look forward to coming in for an interview when I come to Tasmania next year.

Wishing you all a fantastic Summer break (or winter if you’re in the northern hemisphere) and I look forward to many more musical shenanigans and surprises for in 2018 including an opportunity to play at a big festival over east. More to come on that soon.  Also I will be recording my next album too…..I’ll keep you posted on that one too.

Bye for now xox

 

 

 

More musical shenanigans!

It feel’s like it was only a few days ago that I was posting to my webpage and here I am again. I never know how to start my blog posts and I’m always trying to find different ways to get the conversation going, well, not quite conversation because it’s just me talking to my computer but I think you know what I mean.

It was great to play at the Albany Boatshed Markets at the beginning of the month because we got to play on the big stage in the far corner which has a fantastic mural on the wall. A couple of people I knew were there and they were kind enough to take some pictures of us playing. The Albany Boatshed Markets has been going for 10 years now and they have supported live music by booking a couple of acts every Sunday and paying them to play.  We also get some fruit and vegi’s, free coffee and a few other treats depending on who’s there. The same day Peter and I played at the Earl of Spencer Historic Inn and Restaurant so it was a full on day.  I was worried about losing my voice after 4 hours of singing but that was fine, however, my fingers were very sore by the end of the evening. There’s things that I had never anticipated that I would have to think about before I started this musical journey.

On October 14th I had my first house concert in Northam to look forward to.  Tonks is a lovely guy from Voice of the Avon 101.3FM community radio station who has been playing my tracks for the past 12 months after I submitted them to Amrap/Airit. Amrap Airit is a not for profit organisation that promotes and supports Australian Independent artists.  Each time an artist produces an album or EP they can submit a maximum of 3 tracks to Amrap Airit where they are then distributed to Community Radio stations across Australia. It’s a fantastic service and I have had a lot of airplay through this great initiative. I have had many radio interviews and I’ve been invited to many shows to play live, with the presenters that I have built relationships with. Many of them are passionate about music and and love to find new music to play on their shows so in effect their passion supports us to do what we are passionate about. It’s a win win for everyone involved!

Anyway I’ll get back to the House Concert in Northam.  Tonks was my host and we did the concert at his friend’s house Brett and Julie.  Gracie B is an up and coming local artist so she was my support act for the night.  She did a fantastic job and we played a few tunes together too, which was a lot of fun. She’s a lovely young lady only 13 years old and is a great musician. We had a great audience who thoroughly enjoyed themselves and Tonks wrote me a beautiful review for the House Concerts Australia Network page.

Here’s a glowing review from Tonks
“On the 14th October 2017, I hosted a house concert in Northam W.A. My choice of artist for this event was @Dawn Barrington – singer/songwriter from Denmark in WA. At Dawns suggestion I also engaged a young lass from York WA – Gracie B. Gracie is an up and coming singer/songwriter who is just starting out on her musical journey.  Gracie B started proceedings with a twenty minute set and then Dawn performed a forty minute set. We then had a feed (bbq) and both artists did another set each – and a jam session.

Dawn is a consummate musical professional, great entertainer and very nice person to boot. I could not have made a better choice for my first concert. Dawn enthralled the audience during the concert with original music and some covers – and had the audience singing along with her.  Gracie B showed why is she is an up and coming talent with her unique cover versions.  Both Dawn and Gracie met for the first time immediately prior to the concert – but you would not have known that if you were to judge by their jam session!.

This was the first house concert in Northam, but will not be the last. It was a very successful concert.” Allen Tonkin, Voice of the Avon 101.3 fm

I came home on Sunday to a house full of great friends which was very exciting because we catch up around 2 times per year and we met through music which is the most exciting part. I was so looking forward to catching up with these guys we always have the best time together and the best jams. On Sunday night we had the best jam in the history of humankind, I’m biased of course lol ;O)  The guys all play in a band and they brought some friends with them this time which made it all the more fun.

Then on Saturday October 21st Peter and I joined Luke Tulloch to play some tunes at the Baháulláh   200th anniversary Baha u allah shares the beautiful message of hope and enlightenment to all across the planet. It was a great afternoon at Mahsa Anderson’s home in Denmark WA.

This Sunday we will be doing a house concert in Warnbro at a private home. House concerts are really starting to take off here in Australia and House Concerts Australia is where you can sign up as a host or an artist.  It’s free to sign up as a host and you can invite artists from all across Australia to play in your home. It’s a great way to meet the artist and have an affordable fun evening for you and your family and friends.  In the next few months I have some local gigs and a few out of the box gigs and then it’s Xmas!!

Upcoming Eastern States tour
Yep I’m doing it again folks! 
This will be my third solo Eastern States tour in the past 18 months and this time I’m going to take the road north of Sydney although I haven’t decided how far yet or whether to do a U turn once I get to Upper Landsdowne and go southwardss. I have some bookings in Upper Landsdowne, NewcastleGosford and Sydney so far. I will keep you posted on the rest of the bookings when I get them.

Well that’s it from me for this month and I’ll be back next month with more shenanigans.  Over and out Folks!